Period apps have become very fashionable lately, with as many as 200m period tracker app downloads thought to be happening worldwide - however, as much as us girls love the idea of being able to monitor our monthly cycle, it's come to light that women might be using the apps as a form of contraception.

A recent warning issued by leading medical organisation the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, has emphasised the risk of using these apps as opposed to regular contraception, having tested some of the advertised apps independently and finding them to be inaccurate. 

Apparently, only one app available for download has been independently evaluated for effectiveness, and as a whole apps shouldn't be regarded as medical devices as they can't be regulated by professionals.

But for many women who battle with hormone-led contraception such as the pill, the app can be a welcome relief from pill-related side effects. Those trying for a baby also download these apps to track their fertility. However, period tracking apps are not just a medical issue.

Concerns have also been raised by privacy campaigners about how much data is being shared via these apps, with some information being sold by the apps to third parties without the downloader knowing

Speaking in an interview with BBC Health, Sam Smith — a privacy campaigner at medConfidential — voiced his concerns.

'For all medical apps, but especially for conception apps, there needs to be a source people can trust that's independent and says this app is safe for you,' he said.

'You can read the terms and conditions - and legally you are required to. But everybody knows that nobody does.'

He suggests being a bit more careful if the app your are downloading is free of charge - the fee could be your own personal data.

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Would you use a period app as contraception? Let us know your thoughts.