So THIS Is The Best Age To Get Married, Apparently...

So THIS Is The Best Age To Get Married, Apparently...

Scientists claim to have found the best age to tie the knot, but does your life plan measure up with the stats?

Chances are that when you get married, or, of course, if you've already tied the knot, you will have done it at the time in your life that felt best for you and your partner, and while it's for no one to judge when a couple should decide wed, you can guarantee that someone will always throw in their tuppence worth. Now, it's the science folks turn to give us their opinions...

It has long been presumed that couples who wed in their late teens or early twenties are more likely to divorce than couples who wed later on in life. Of course, there are expectations to the rule — I myself tied the knot with my husband at the age of 24 and I certainly hope our days aren't numbered just because we didn't wait a few years — but generally speaking, divorce rates in couples who married in their early years were thought to have a higher chance of going their separate ways further down the line.

However, that's not exactly the case. Marital splits are higher across every age group with the figures growing rather alarmingly in just five short years. And now, those who marry in their mid-30s or later are actually MORE likely to divorce than those who marry in their late 20s — so says Nicholas H. Wolfinger, a University of Utah psychologist, in his new research for the Institute for Family Studies at least. 

So, what does that mean exactly? Are we all doomed to have failed marriages? Not according to Wolfinger's stats...

There is one age group that has seen a DECLINE in the divorce rates YOY, which has led Nicholas and his team to believe that they've found the age that *basically* equates to the marital sweet-spot. The question is, how does your life plan it in with their stats? 

'My data analysis shows that prior to age 30 or so, each additional year of age at marriage reduces the odds of divorce by 11 percent,' Wolfinger writes. 'However, after that, the odds of divorce increase by 5 percent per year.' 

Characterised into five key age groups — the under 20s; the 20-24s; 25-29s; 30-34 and the 35+ — the only category to see a decline in the number of divorces between 2005 and 2010 was the 30-34-year-olds, with Nicholas suggesting that 32 is the optimum age to day your 'I do's'. Here's the figures in an easy to read bar chart for you to mull over... 

Now, before you go calling off your wedding until you and your partner are in your early 30s, it pays to remember that a happy marriage doesn't just happen when you follow the stats, nor is it poised to fail either. And although it seems rather untimely to release these findings in what's essentially peak wedding season, with divorce rates starting to fall in even one group, it looks like our split-culture may be turning on its head. 

Now, excuse me while I ring my hubby to prove to myself that love is not dead... 

 
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