Mark Zuckerberg's all-grey wardrobe

Tough decision, Mark...

Mark Zuckerberg's morning outfit decision is a tough one. Grey t-shirt and grey hoody, or grey t-shirt and grey hoody? The Facebook creator shared this image of his post-paternity wardrobe, consisting of nine identical grey-marl t-shirts and eight drawstring hoodies.

Sound boring? We steer clear of wearing the same look two days in a row, but his day-to-day uniform might actually be the reason Mark's such a genius - kind of. According to a recent study, deciding what to wear every day could be making us unhappy - and killing our brain cells.

A messy wardrobe could be making you unhappy, according to Daniel Levitin

Speaking to CNN, neuroscientist Daniel Levitin says that the more choice we give ourselves in what to wear, the more we’re decreasing our brainpower, in what’s known as “information overload”. Apparently we’re giving our brain more information than it can handle, and our wardrobe is a major culprit. Now there’s a legitimate reason to wear the same clothes for four days running…

Basically, the messier your wardrobe, and the more you have to choose from, the more stressed you’ll be – it’s called “decision fatigue”. Daniel thinks we’re totally overestimating the amount of things we can juggle at the same time in our brain: “The conscious mind can attend to about three things at once. Any more than that, and you’re going to lose some brainpower”. It can even be toxic to the body, and leave you feeling fuzzy headed.

Put simply, you can consider jeans, skirts and jumpsuits, but shorts and dresses might push you over the edge. And nope, laying out your clothes, underwear and all, the night before won’t help either. You’re still wasting unnecessary energy, thinks Daniel.

So how do we hold on to our precious brain cells? Mark Zuckerberg and Steve Jobs should be your new wardrobe decision inspo. No, we’re not suggesting you dig out some high-waisted jeans and black polonecks, but instead, rock the same outfit every single day. Barack Obama and even Albert Einstein are fans of the one outfit rule, too, supposedly because “they didn’t want to waste valuable energy making inconsequential decisions about their clothes”.

We’d hardly call fashion inconsequential, but we see what you’re saying, Daniel. Limiting our look to a single style would make getting dressed in the morning a lot quicker, but we’re not so sure we can commit to just one outfit. Instead, you can slim your wardrobe down to the bare essentials, and pack away your seasonal pieces until the sun shines again. Or, read InStyle’s tips on dressing for the job you want right here.

Will you be saving your brain cells? Let us know below!