Kim Kardashian is naked on social media again (we'll pause for the shock to sink in). Showing off her 'tan' on her Snapchat account, Kim stripped down to, well, nothing, and it's no surprise that the internet has kicked off.

It's not the first time Mrs Kardashian-West has posted a naked selfie, and it probably won't be the last, but is the move a feminist statement (as Kim has previously suggested), or something more damaging for females and body ideals?

Speaking to Kara Swisher on Recode Decode, the social media mogul previously said: 'My personality has never been, ‘I’m such a feminist and follow me and be naked!’ If you are conservative and that’s how you are comfortable, more power to you. I respect you. You don’t have to look at what I do […] If I like the photo, and I’m into it, I’ll post it…I just think it looks good. I’m really not trying to cause a reaction. I truly was baffled when people still cared. They have seen me naked 500 times. The censor bar literally was probably more covered than a bikini. I could not grasp how people were so outraged'.

Hmm. Here at InStyle HQ, we're still debating the issue. Our for and against sounds a little something like this…


FOR (by Isabella Silvers, Digital Assistant)
Kim Kardashian-West — love her or hate her, you’ve definitely seen her naked, and you’ve probably got an opinion on it. But rather than outrage, my response is more of an eye roll.

To be honest, I’m not that against Kim’s bare body. Yes, she’s a mother, yes, she’s a wife and YES, she’s a role model to millions, but she’s also a human being with her own mind, and she has the right to share a naked mirror selfie on her personal Instagram page if she wants to. Her body, her rules – isn’t that the message we’ve all been trying to spread?

Don’t get me wrong, I totally see the other side of this debate. Women and girls should be encouraged to know they have more to offer than their bodies and their beauty, so I’m with Chloe Moretz on that one. Bette Midler, kinda funny. The problem I have with Kim’s response, apart from the fact it was actually pretty rude, is that she could have used her platform (41.5million followers…) to explain the very message she then posted on her website a day later – not that she needed to explain herself in the first place. Chloe’s Tweet was well intentioned, so there’s no need to be catty.

Women these days seem to be either deemed ‘too naked’ or ‘too covered up’. I can’t see why we should only encourage women to love their bodies to a certain extent – who are we to police their body positivity? If you don’t like Kim’s naked selfies, you don’t have to follow her – she’s free to post whatever she likes. But at the same time, her super-stardom does make her a role model, and she does have a responsibility to prove to her impressionable fans that it’s not all about T&A. 


AGAINST (by Rebecca Gillam, Digital Writer)
I just think Kim Kardashian doesn’t come from the best starting off point for this kind of discussion. She posts a naked selfie and then a follow-up essay and it makes me (and I’d imagine a few others) eye roll. Not because of a sex tape that happened 13 years ago, as she talks about in her essay, but because I don’t think she behaves in a way which makes me proud to be a woman or empowered by my sexuality. 

If there was any part of doubting whether my eye roll was justified, her Tweets about ‘cashing my 80 million video game check & transferring 53 million into our joint account’ and her childish retorts to her celebrity Twitter opposers — about ‘fake friends’ and chiding a young actress for people not knowing who she is — put a speedy stop to that.

I like that it’s part of a wider discussion about the empowerment of women as 'body-shaming' and ‘slut-shaming’ is obviously not ok, never has been and never will be, but I don’t think a woman who is famous for being a reality TV star posting a censored picture of herself is empowering. 

Far from being proud of her body, it’s a picture from a year ago before she’d had her second child — it’s fuelling the flames for people wanting the ‘perfect body’. Obviously what that means differs — it’s positive she’s not stick thin, at a time when teenagers are being influenced by models with unhealthy BMIs, but they don’t need another unrealistic ideal to aspire to. It’s not about bodies — it’s about being influential and impressive, and I don’t think that’s got anything to do with appearance, naked or not.

Back in March, Emily and Kim shared a pic captioned: 'When we're like...we both have nothing to wear LOL @emrata' prompting some pretty hilarious comments (of the 54,053 and counting) like 'U have enough clothes to fill two countries and more money than most. WHAT DO U MEAN NOTHING TO WEAR'. Fair, fair.


For a little background on this issue, it all started when Kim posted a naked selfie on Instagram, and social media got involved:

First Bette Midler and Chloe Grace Moretz Tweeted:

Kim responded:

(Bear in mind this was #InternationalWomensDay — not the day for females being social media bishes.)

Then Emily Ratajkowski, who wrote an essay for Lenny pro female nakedness, Abigail Breslin and Miley Cyrus got involved…

...and this happened:

Emily Ratajkoswki then posted an Instagram of a bunch of flowers from Kim with the caption: 

'Thank you for the beautiful flowers and note @kimkardashian it's so important that we let women express their sexuality and share their bodies however they choose."Merely external emancipation has made of the modern woman an artificial being. Now, woman is confronted with the necessity of emancipating herself from emancipation, if she really desires to be free." Emma Goldman.' Verdict?


A photo posted by Emily Ratajkowski (@emrata) on


Kim also penned an essay on the issue, elaborating on her right to post a naked selfie: 'In all seriousness, I never understand why people get so bothered by what other people choose to do with their lives. I don’t do drugs, I hardly drink, I’ve never committed a crime—and yet I’m a bad role model for being proud of my body?

It always seems to come back around to my sex tape. Yes, a sex tape that was made 13 years ago. 13 YEARS AGO. Literally that lonnng ago. And people still want to talk about it?!?! I lived through the embarrassment and fear, and decided to say who cares, do better, move on. I shouldn’t have to constantly be on the defense, listing off my accomplishments just to prove that I am more than something that happened 13 years ago. 

I am empowered by my body. I am empowered by my sexuality. I am empowered by feeling comfortable in my skin. I am empowered by showing the world my flaws and not being afraid of what anyone is going to say about me. And I hope that through this platform I have been given, I can encourage the same empowerment for girls and women all over the world. 

I feel so lucky to have grown up surrounded by strong, driven, independent women. The life lessons I’ve learned from my sisters, my mother and my grandmother, I will pass along to my daughter. I want her to be proud of who she is. I want her to be comfortable in her body. I don’t want her to grow up in a world where she is made to feel less-than for embracing everything it means to be a woman.

It’s 2016. The body-shaming and slut-shaming—it’s like, enough is enough. I will not live my life dictated by the issues you have with my sexuality. You be you and let me be me.

I am a mother. I am a wife, a sister, a daughter, an entrepreneur and I am allowed to be sexy'

Continued below...

Kim Kardashian naked - do you support it? Let us know below!