They're the beacons of our childhood, the stars of the films we pretend to no longer watch [but actually love more than anything else in the world] and the first women we came to idolise. Yep, we're talking about the Disney princesses who, in all their pitch-perfect singing and animal communicating glory, were the ladies we wanted to be more than anything from the ages of three to thirteen (or thirty, if you care to admit it). 

However, in recent years the darling princesses have found themselves at the centre of countless controversies, mostly due to their respective appearances. They've been heralded as 'too beautiful', and arguably contribute to the unrealistic beauty standards our society is pretty well built on today. And, to be fair, there's got to be some truth to it. 

Personally, I remember when I was around the age of four or five, and I was with my mum in a well-known high street shoe shop when I saw a drawing of my favourite Disney princess from my youth — Aurora from Sleeping Beauty — on the wall, to which I said, 'I wish I was as pretty as her'. My mother was clearly upset about my statement, but I was deadly serious.

The fact that this second-long realisation still sticks in my mind decades later can only be a testament to the influence our favourite cartoon characters have had on our lives, which makes this latest news all the more alarming. 

The talent at website Above Average have spotted a trend in the bodies of Disney princesses, and have set out on a quest to highlight it. The scandal? That *most* of them have eyes that are bigger than their stomachs and waists. Yep, for reals.

Of course, this is genetically impossible but when you put pen to paper, anything goes apparently. And here's the proof... 

Ariel from The Little Mermaid

Elsa from Frozen

Jasmine from Aladdin

Aurora from Sleeping Beauty

Tiana from The Princess and the Frog

Belle from Beauty and the Beast

If that's not a pattern, we don't know what is. As you can see, the yellow bar indicates the width of the eyes and the red the waist, and shown together in the corners of the pictures, you can see just how warped the proportions are. 

There's no doubt about it, this is shocking and it definitely paints a bleak picture for young girls who love these characters so much but, at the same time, look nothing like them. However, it can definitely be argued that aside from their unrealistic figures and beauty, Disney princesses have taught us more about sticking up for yourself and getting what you want (whether it's a prince or not) than any other character. In fact, some of them are even badass feminists too.

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What do you think about the Disney princesses? Are they role models for young girls or are they too beautiful for their own good? Let us know in the comments below...