In the latest Insta-celeb-bashing news, Anne Hathaway’s been hated on for a post she put up saying ‘In A World Of Kardashians, Be A Helena Bonham Carter’. Quelle surprise, the internet went bonkers — trolling the actress for ‘putting people down’.

The (usually inoffensive) actress chose to actually delete the meme — unlike Blake Lively who got in trouble for posting a Cannes red carpet pic with the lyrics ‘L.A face with an Oakland booty' — and instead posted a pic saying: ‘Post removed for unintended shade thrown’.


Is it REALLY a big deal? Team InStyle battles it out…

Go, Anne! — by Rebecca Gillam, Digital Writer

I feel pretty neutral about Anne Hathaway, but I do bloody love Helena Bonham Carter, and I wholeheartedly didn’t take against that Instagram. While I agree putting people down isn’t right, an acknowledgement that individuality and nonconformity should be respected above  — what appears to be — mass obsession with materialism and vanity seems o-k to me.

I doubt Anne was taking individually against every Kardashian, but in their quest for global domination the family name has become something of a brand, synonymous with the message they project on social media which seems to be predominantly about selfies, contouring and lip fillers. Helena, who’s just acted alongside Anne in Alice Through The Looking Glass, seems to steer clear of the limelight where possible and not put too much value on what people think of her. (I can’t be sure about this but odd shoes and living in co-joining houses to one’s partner does suggest giving approximately and admirably zero f**ks.) Even the biggest Kardashian fan could probably accept that we should be spreading the message to be yourself, rather than being pressured into conforming, and the Insta-moguls don’t seem to be projecting that.

The Kardashians seem to be on the end of these arguments again and again... Is taking a naked selfie empowering for women? Is taking another naked selfie an act of feminism? Is featuring in an Instagram vs. Helena negative? No, but it sure is getting them column inches.

No, Anne! — by Isabella Silvers, Digital Assistant

Continued below...

Feminism: whether they're talking about it in interviews or posting quotes on Instagram, celebrities just can't seem to get it 'right'. Anne Hathaway is the latest A-lister to land in hot water over her Helena Bonham Carter post, and I can kind of see why.

I'd put money on the fact that Anne never meant to 'throw shade' at the Kardashians, and was more trying to support her Alice Through The Looking Glass co-star, but you don't need to put a group of people down to raise someone else up. If feminism is about supporting equality for everyone, the Kardashians have as much a right to be themselves as Helena does, and equally I think it would be nicer to not try and be 'more like' anyone but the best version of yourself (wow, that was cheesy, but you know what I mean).

There's no 'right' way to be a feminist, but I'm not sure if this kind of thing is the right idea to be circulating. I don't even think Anne herself agrees with that sentiment; as she said in her following post, 'It never occurred to me I was pitting anyone against each other. Not my style. Peace x'. That hits the nail on the head, really. Pitting females against each other isn't beneficial when it comes to the way people look, and while I agree with encouraging people to be individual and be themselves, you don't have to put down Kim and co to do that.   

Also if you don't want to be like the Kardashians, that's cool, but you don't have to make a meme about it. Think about it this way - say you know two people called Nicola and Nancy. You want to be more like Nancy, but you're sure as hell not going to post that on Facebook, right?! I don't see why it should be any different in regards to celebrities. They're still people, with feelings, and the internet is a public place…

So what can we do now? Well, just be ourselves - isn't that enough?