Beyonce is the queen of bare faced cheek

Amy Shumer is hilarious and I’m a massive fan. Her spoof video ‘Girl You Don’t Need Make-up’ where a faux One Direction sing her into taking all hers off, only to be disgusted and get her to put it back on again, is amazing and well worth the watch for its comedy value.  But when she launched a bare-faced Twitter campaign last night, I just rolled my eyes and groaned like an adolescent.

Thousands of women have joined in the frenzy already and the hashtag #Girlyoudontneedmakeup is massively trending today. Thing is, it’s just so darn obvious - I know I don’t need make-up, I like it.

Some things about being a woman are way boring, namely male bosses, the phrase ‘beach body’ and of course tampons. But make-up is not one of them. The ten minutes I allocate each morning to doing my make-up are far more pleasurable than the others earmarked for showering and making my lunch. Makeup is fun for me, a way to be creative with my look and I see that entirely as a positive thing.

I can confidently say I do not feel oppressed in any way by my eyeliner.

For this reason I hate no-make-up selfies. I see that they’re meant as a celebration of natural female beauty and I’m all "go for it sister!” about that, but to be called ‘brave’ for daring to show your face in public without the usual contouring, highlighting and concealing seems the most anti-feminist viewpoint possible. Instead, shouldn’t it be? "This is my face without make-up and this is it with. No biggie, it just looks different.”

Celebrities like Beyonce and Cheryl F-V look amazing in their no-make-up selfies but is that really any great revelation? I would say not. They’re both gorgeous ladies and make-up is only clever enhancing, not a full-on imposter mask.

But what about celebrities who don’t choose to bare all? Are they cowards? Liars? Anti-feminist? Gasp! No, they’re girls who choose to keep a certain look as standard and that doesn’t mean they secretly full of self loathing

I once interviewed Olivia Palermo who was chatty, open and good company with no crippling insecurities that I could detect in our ten minutes together. When I asked her about going make-up free in public she said it wouldn’t happen, “You won’t ever see me getting milk in my sweat pants. I like getting up and getting dressed, ready for the day.” In my opinion that just means she feels at her best and most capable when she’s put together and pristine. I think that sounds professional and far from insecure.

I don’t mind being seen with or without my make-up on, I just don’t think the difference is remarkable enough to join the throng. In fact, some might dare to call it feminist to have the choice and decide for yourself what’s best for you. And for me, that really is the best thing about being a woman.